Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

Up until about a year ago I never expected to see a bald eagle on the farm. Due to excessive hunting by humans and the insecticide DDT, bald eagles were considered endangered or threatened for much of my childhood. Combined with the fact that they are sea eagles and principally eat fish, it was absurd to think I would ever see one in this part of Virginia. Yet here they are. Incredibly, it might even be a breeding pair that’s been visiting the farm over the past several days.

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Their resurgence is the result of an amazing conservation effort. In the 1950s there were only 412 known nesting pairs. With the banning of DDT and severe restrictions  on hunting, the birds are no longer listed as endangered or even threatened. Their increased numbers means that they are starting to re-occupy territory in parts of the United States where they have not been seen in living memory. Extremely cagey and hyper-alert, I have yet to get close enough for a decent photo of these amazing birds of prey. Even so, it is always inspiring to see this massive eagle – their average wing span can be 7-1/2 feet wide – take flight and soar over the family farm.

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Pickerel Frog (Lithobates palustris)

Found commonly over much of the east coast and as far west as Texas, the pickerel frog lives happily in Virginia’s Piedmont. While it looks similar to the leopard frog, the pickerel’s distinctive rectangular spots are an easy way to tell the two species apart. As you would expect of any frog, the pickerel is often found near streams and ponds. The lack of webbing between its toes also suggests that it spends more time on land than other frogs.

Amazingly, the pickerel frog is the only poisonous frog native to North America. Similar to eastern American toads, the toxin it secretes through its skin is only mildly irritating to humans if rubbed in the eyes or mucus membranes. However, its poison is more potent to smaller animals and even deadly to amphibians.

Rock Dove (Columba livia)

Doves. Pigeons. Flying rats. Birds from the Columba family are called by many names. Rock Doves are one of the most common birds in the world. While they are now found in almost every major city worldwide, their native habitat is Europe, North Africa, and South Asia. On the farm they typically roost under the hay hood of the barn and scavenge seeds in the surrounding fields.

Rock doves are known for being monogamous with both parents caring for clutches of one to two eggs. Amazingly, both parents also produce “crop milk” to nourish the squabs through their first week of life. Unique to doves, flamingos, and some penguins, crop milk is a dense mixture of fat and protein produced by the crop lining. The cheese-like secretion also contains antioxidants, bacteria, and immune-enhancing compounds.

Young squab is a also delicacy. While now they can be found in grocery stores, in 18th and early-19th Virginia wealthy landowners occasionally built elaborate dovecotes to attract breeding doves. These buildings – with their warm and cozy nesting boxes – allowed the gentry to easily harvest the young birds just days before they took their first flight.

Widow Skimmer (Progomphus obscurus)

One of the most common dragonflies in the United States, widow skimmers can be seen throughout North America. While they are often found near still bodies of water, this skimmer was instead photographed in the vegetable garden hunting asparagus beetle larvae. I hope it did not flyaway hungry.

The widow skimmer in the photo is a juvenile. As it grows to adulthood, its body will turn powdery blue. Widow skimmers are also easy to identify as they are the only species of skimmers with broad stripes on both the fore- and hindwings. Adult male skimmers can also be quickly identified by bands of white on their wings.

Red Footed Cannibal Fly (Promachus rufipes)

A member of the Robber Fly (Asilidea) family, these flying terrors are also known as Assassin flies. Similar to dragonflies, Cannibal flies are voracious hunters who ambush their prey in mid-air. They principally feed on bees, ants, grasshoppers, dragonflies, and other insects. After they’ve caught their victim, Cannibal flies use their proboscis to inject liquefying neurotoxins and proteolytic enzymes into the insect’s body. The fly will then find a quiet spot to feed. After a few moments, all that will be left will be an empty shell. Promachus rufipes_RedFootedCannibalFly_201607

Broadhead Skink (Plestiodon laticeps)

Largest of the native skinks in Virginia, broadhead  skinks are virtually indistinguishable from five-lined skinks when young. With the blue tails and five lighter lines, only a slight variation in their scales distinguish them from their cousins. Adult females – which can grow up to 13″ long – are typically larger than adult males and retain their lines. As seen in the photo, adult males have a more uniform body color offset by an ostentatious red-orange head and neck during the spring mating season.

Spending time on the ground as well as in trees, these non-poisonous insectivores reproduce by laying eggs. Common throughout the Southeastern United States they typically are seen around our house and in the adjoining planting beds. As a child I remember skinks being fairly rare, but their numbers have increased over the past 10 years to a point where they are now a common site during the warmer months.

American Robin (Turdus migratorius)

This is an easy one to start with. The second most abundant bird in North American, robins are endemic on the farm and are the first migratory birds to arrive in late winter and possibly winter over. Easily identifiable by their reddish-orange breast, they are often seen in large flocks on the farm in the early spring but become more solitary in the summer. They are profuse breeders. According to wikipedia, produce two to three broods a year hatched from their distinctive blue eggs. This fecundity appears to be much needed as only 25% of young robins survive their first year and the average lifespan is a short two years.

The robin pictured below was photographed on an August morning atop a willow oak. With a mouth full of  invertebrates, this master hunter was no doubt rushing home to feed its last hatchlings of year.

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